Matteo Giuntini

Matteo Giunitini, born in 1977, is a well-established and successful Italian artist.
Matteo studied art at the School of Art in Pisa, Italy, and already directly after his graduation in the early 2000s he took part in many solo and group exhibitions in Tuscany.
Throughout the years Matteo has participated in several art fairs in Europe, his art has evoked attention and been presented in magazines and on TV. His collaboration with dedicated art galleries has brought him in to the art market and laid a foundation for his success and future art career. His art has found collectors both in Italy and other parts of the world, e.g. France, Netherlands, Singapore, Switzerland, Sweden, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom and USA.

Matteo creates his works using several different techniques and media, such as paintings and collage in oil, acrylic and a sort of gumming. As canvas he often uses unexpected materials, at times you’ll find old discarded sunshades/awnings and old military raincoats/tents.


Matteo Giuntini's art can be considered as an original form of storytelling, an indirectly autobiographical one, based on a personal codebook of signs and symbols, fictitious characters, reinvented icons, lettering and large strokes and slash of colour. All trying to build mental labyrinths, absorbing the visual memories and feelings derived from the emotions and irony with which Giuntini, at every brush-stroke seems to have a special dialogue. This dialogue is the core and the trademark of his art.


When the brush dwells upon the canvas - crossing it, splitting it, beating it at the rhythm of a musical score...Matteo's work comes to life. Indeed music is the prime driver of the art of this painter who, with headphones on and brush in his hand lay down the foundations of his compositions, resulting either from syncopated rhythms or long sonorities that spread, colouring large monochromatic stretches.
It is there, over these chromatic improvisations that Matteo's personal visual vocabulary of codes and symbols enjoy a new life. The symbolic component of his art, derived from the metropolitan graffiti culture as well as from a strongly marked vein for cartoons and comics, is a constant presence on the large canvases of the artist, allowing deep thoughts, hardly conceived behind a childish language, to come up.
This way the “Good Luck” inscription reminds us more of the battle that man has to engage in in his everyday life than of a message of good luck wish.


Hearts and spades pursue each other on the canvas and the red cherries call to mind slot machines promising wealth and glory. On the other hand, as “4Sale” seems to point out, nothing is free and the toothless smiles want to show how there can be imperfection even in apparently fair things and how people are often led to hide their feeling and emotions behind a fake smile.

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